Monthly Archives: March 2009

  • Holy Day or Holiday?

    The practice of setting aside one day in seven for the worship of God, the rest of the body, the extension of mercy and the refrain from “worldly” activities enjoyed nearly universal acceptance in American Christian practice from 1776 until 1960. Obviously, no longer is this the case. What happened? A lot. Theological liberalism and dispensationalism happened. Television, sports and malls happened. As a result Sunday has become less of a holy day and more of a holiday.Sunday has become less set aside for mercy, worship and rest and more for errands, entertainment and recreation. That’s not to say Christians have stopped worshipping. They haven’t done that. But worship has become an “add-on.” For some worship is done on Saturday so as to leave all of Sunday “open” for other activities. For others worship is, in fact ,reserved for Sunday … Read More »

  • The Great Dialogue

    Liturgies are like excuses: Everybody has one. Simply put, liturgy is what people do when they worship. So no matter how much a church may insist that there is no liturgy, one will inevitably emerge. Equally important to recognize is that liturgies are shaped by a theological paradigm. Therefore, Presbyterians should not expect to worship like Charismatics and Anglicans and Roman Catholics because our theological convictions differ.

    What is it that shapes, most fundamentally and at the most basic level, our worship? The answer is: The Covenant of Grace. Our system of doctrine as articulated in the Westminster Standards is arranged according to the doctrine of the covenant. Hence we confess a robust covenant theology. Likewise our worship is to be arranged accordingly.

    A covenant in Scripture is the expression of God’s voluntary condescension wherein he bridges … Read More »

  • Preparing For Worship

    “…God is to be worshipped everywhere, in spirit and truth; as, in private families daily, and in secret, each one by himself; so, more solemnly in public assemblies…(WCF 21:6).” Notice the three-fold pattern of worship in the Christian life highlighted by our confession: private, family, corporate. This WWDWWD is about the first two. My greatest times of success in athletic competition were always during seasons of great success in my practice sessions. Similarly, what we do during the week as Christians profoundly affects what happens when we gather corporately on Sundays.

    “…God is to be worshipped everywhere, in spirit and truth; as, in private families daily, and in secret, each one by himself; so, more solemnly in public assemblies…(WCF 21:6).”

    Personal or private worship is that worship done in secret wherein our souls are disciplined to lean upon Christ and freshly appropriate … Read More »

  • Why We Do What We Do

    Why do some churches have a drama presentation and we don’t? How come we don’t have announcements in the middle of the service? Why does the pastor lead the service and not a “worship leader”? Why do we confess our faith and pray the Lord’s Prayer? Why do we confess our sins? Why do we have a call to worship followed by an invocation? Why does the pastor lift his hands at the end of the service and pronounce a benediction? Why do we sing Psalms? Why does the pastor pay such close attention to the text of the Bible when he is preaching? Why do the elders offer such detailed and thought out prayers, rather that spontaneous prayers that are shorter? Why do we take and offering instead of … Read More »